Victim Shaming Authors – Not Okay

I woke up to a lovely blurb on Goodreads by an author that I’ve read before. She included the publisher’s explanation of why they included dashed out profanity in a non-fiction book. Her purpose in doing this was to leave a strong exhortation that people should not waste their money on this book because such language is an offense to God. Here is the publisher’s note:

“The story you are about to read is true. The events depicted include violent situations and vulgar language of a kind that typically doesn’t appear in books we publish. But after careful consideration, we decided to include some dialogue that, though potentially offensive, is accurate, helps to capture the intensity of the events in an authentic way, and gives a truthful illustration of the human condition.”

Victim Shaming Authors

I left a polite (too polite of a comment, really) challenging this person that Jesus Christ entered into our sufferings. He didn’t tell us what we could and couldn’t share with Him about these sufferings. Jesus Christ has already witnessed the horrible things, including the profane words, that Ruth Everhart experienced while she was held hostage and raped at gunpoint. And to instruct her on how to tell her story is wrong. To admonish other Christians not to read her book because she tells the truth about what happened, including the colorful details we want to wish away, is victim shaming. I absolutely hate victim shaming, and I hate it even more when it happens in the church of Jesus Christ. As Christians we ought to know better.

Here is a link to her book, “Ruined.” I plan to read it. Let me know if you want to read it together 🙂

Here is my question: what about the offense to God of rape? What about the offense to God of the church shaming people for being of loose morals when sexual abuse happens? Yes, I am a witness to such behavior. Though there are some churches that have great support systems in place for survivors of abuse, it is shockingly rare. It is wrong to victim shame authors that feel the need to share in a blunt manner. I think this is especially true when someone is writing non-fiction. I could talk about this topic all day, but I actually have a page on another blog that discusses how we can support survivors in a Christlike way.

Now to get back to editing Kerfuffle, which also deals with not one, but two very sensitive topics that in general Christians don’t want to discuss. Because that’s who I am. That’s what I do. Transverse the bubble with me.

Happy reading,

Kristin

P.S. Here is the synopsis of Ruined, in case you are interested in context.

“It happened on a Sunday night, even though I’d been a good girl and gone to church that morning.”

One brisk November evening during her senior year at a small Midwestern Christian college, two armed intruders broke into the house Ruth Everhart shared with her roommates, held all five girls hostage, and took turns raping them at gunpoint. Reeling with fear, insecurity, and guilt, Ruth believed she was ruined, both physically and in the eyes of God.

In the days and weeks that followed, Ruth struggled to come to grips with not only what happened that night but why. The same questions raced through her mind in an unrelenting loop—questions that would continue to haunt her for years to come:

Why me? Where was God? Why did God allow this to happen? What am I being punished for?

Told with candor and unflinching honesty, Ruined is an extraordinary emotional and spiritual journey that begins with an unspeakable act of violence but ends with tremendous healing and profound spiritual insights about faith, forgiveness, and the will of God.

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